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In 2016,

is expected to lose

for too many readmissions.

Its score was than the 2016 state average and than its score in 2015.

That amount represents % of inpatient Medicare revenues, roughly reflecting how many more patients than expected had to be readmitted.

is expected to lose

for hospital-acquired conditions.

Its score was than the 2016 state average and than its score in 2015.

This hospital had a score of . Hospitals in the bottom 25th percentile, with scores roughly 7 or higher, lose 1% of their Medicare revenues.

for quality of care ratings.

Its score was than the 2016 state average and than its score in 2015.

That amount represents % of inpatient Medicare revenues, based on scores for things like patient outcomes, satisfaction and cost efficiency.

Medicare's readmission reduction program tries to motivate hospitals to reduce avoidable hospital readmissions by financial penalties only rather than rewards. The penalty reduces the amount hospitals receive from Medicare for inpatient care by up to 3 percent. For 2016, it is based on whether the hospitals had more readmissions than expected among patients treated for heart failure, heart attack, pneumonia, chronic lung problems, and elective hip and knee replacements.

The orthopedic procedures were added to the measure for 2016, and some hospitals have struggled to reduce readmissions in that patient population -- hence some of the increases in penalties.

The penalties are greater for hospitals with excessive rates of patients suffering healthcare-acquired infections or other conditions. Medicare uses a 10-point scoring system for hospitals, with a lower score being better, that accounts for preventive postoperative problems such as sepis infections or bed sores, and for central line associated bloodstream infections and catheter associated urinary tract infections.

Hospitals in the bottom 25 percent for these scores each year are assessed a 1 percent penalty. The penalty amounts are greater because the deduction is based off Medicare payments for inpatient care but also off payments to hospital for their capital, medical education and other expenses.

The federal Medicare Value Based Purchasing Program rewards or penalizes hospitals based on data reflecting the following:

  • Following proper care procedures (10 percent of score in 2016)
  • Patient satisfaction surveys (25 percent)
  • Patient outcomes for select conditions (40 percent)
  • Hospital cost efficiency (25 percent)

Hospitals can be rewarded for scoring highly on these measures or for making substantial improvement on them.

The reward program is funded by a reduction in the base rates that hospitals receive from Medicare for inpatient care. While individual hospitals in the state have gained or lost, the overall program has worked to Minnesota's advantage. In aggregate, Minnesota hospitals are expected to gain $5.9 million in rewards from Medicare for their good value in federal fiscal year 2016.

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Source: Minnesota Hospital Association, Medicare

Scorecard by C.J. Sinner, Star Tribune